Tamron Developing New 100-400mm F/4.5-6.3 Di VC USD Lens

Tamron has announced development is underway for its new 100-400mm F/4.5-6.3 Di VC USD (Model A035) lens. Compact and lightweight at 39.3 ounces, the ultra-telephoto zoom is designed for full-frame Canon and Nikon DSLRs. Tamron says important areas of the lens barrel are constructed of a magnesium material that’s meant to “improve weight reduction, strength and portability” in the lens. Release is scheduled for some time by the end of 2017.

The new lens features optical construction consisting of three LD (Low Dispersion) lens elements to mitigate chromatic aberrations, plus Tamron’s anti-reflection eBAND (Extended Bandwidth & Angular-Dependency) Coating to help eliminate ghosting and flare.

The newest Tamron lens models feature a high-speed Dual MPU (Micro-Processing Unit) control system, and so will the new 100-400mm. The system is designed to provide the lens with “quick and highly responsive autofocus performance and outstanding vibration compensation.”

Other features include a 59-inch minimum object distance, a 1:3.6 max magnification ratio and a fluorine coating to protect the moisture-resistant lens from the elements. The 100-400mm is compatible with Tamron’s 1.4x teleconverter and the TAP-in Console for lens adjustments.

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RED Introduces WEAPON MONSTRO 8K VV

The cinematic full-frame sensor for WEAPON cameras features a whopping 17+ stops of dynamic range, capturing 8K video at up to 60 fps and delivering 35-megapixel still photos

At the RED booth at Cine Gear 2017 earlier this, we checked out the WEAPON 8K and the results it’s capable of delivering. Now RED has introduced the WEAPON MONSTRO 8K VV. The cinematic full-frame sensor for WEAPON cameras features a whopping 17+ stops of dynamic range, capturing 8K video at up to 60 fps and delivering 35-megapixel still photos. Priced at $79,500 (camera Brain only), the sensor is scheduled for early 2018 delivery.

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GoPro Launches Hero6 Black

The new HERO6 Black features a custom-engineered GP1 processor, 4K60 and 1080p240 video shooting and improved video stabilization—the most advanced in any GoPro camera, says the company—all designed to deliver higher-quality images. Additional enhancements include improved dynamic range and low-light performance, in addition to RAW and HDR photo modes.
The HERO6 Black has a rugged form factor and is waterproof to 33 feet, and when used with the GoPro app, users can share QuikStories short videos from smartphones—three times faster than previous GoPro cameras.
Here’s a look at additional features:
• All-new Touch Zoom
• Three times faster offload speeds via 5 GHz WiFi
• Compatible with the Karma drone and existing GoPro mounts
• Voice control in 10 languages
• GPS, accelerometer and gyroscope incorporated
• WiFi + Bluetooth-compatible
• Getting an update is the compact and portable Karma drone. Compatible with the just announced HERO6 Black, the Karma has two new Auto modes: Follow mode follows the Karma Controller, framing the user in the shot, and Watch mode automatically keeps the Controller in frame while hovering in place while rotating.
• Max speed is 35 mph, with a maximum distance of up to 9,840 feet and a maximum flight altitude of 10,500 feet. The Karma has a 5-inch screen with 720p screen resolution and 900 nits of screen brightness
Current Karma drone owners can get the new features via a firmware update, available now.

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Nikon D50: extreme resolution, fantastic image quality, fast shooting, and an exceptional build

The Nikon D850 offers the best of all worlds: extreme resolution, fantastic image quality, fast shooting, and an exceptional build. It’s our favorite pro SLR.
The D850 follows the same basic design paradigm as the D810 and other models before it. It’s a traditional SLR without a built-in vertical shooting grip (an add-on is available), with a body design that’s about the same size (4.9 by 5.8 by 3.1 inches, HWD) and weight (2 pounds) as its predecessor. The portion of the body between the grip and lens mount is a bit slimmer, which gives the grip a deeper feel, without having it jut further out from the camera. Because of this, the D850 feels just a bit more comfortable in the hand, improving on the D810’s excellent ergonomic design. But it also strays in a few key aspects. First, it eliminates the flash that Nikon previously included in the D700 and D800 series. Pro photographers don’t typically utilize a pop-up flash to shoot events or portraits, but it’s a useful tool for wirelessly controlling off-camera Speedlights. You’ll need to mount a flash to control off-camera units that take commands via an optical signal, or invest in a radio control system for your flashes. If you currently use a pop-up flash as a wireless commander, it’s an extra expense to consider when mulling an upgrade.
Losing the flash isn’t all bad. For one thing, it improves durability and weather protection, putting the D850 on the same level as the DX flagship D500. It also means there’s more room for the viewfinder, which Nikon has taken advantage of. The magnification has been improved to 0.75x, palpably larger than the D810’s 0.7x viewfinder, and image quality has been improved using a new aspheric element and condenser in the eyepiece. I’ve not had the chance to use the camera side by side with the D5 or Canon’s flagship 1D X Mark II, but the D850’s viewfinder is a noticeable step up from the D810.
But it also strays in a few key aspects. First, it eliminates the flash that Nikon previously included in the D700 and D800 series. Pro photographers don’t typically utilize a pop-up flash to shoot events or portraits, but it’s a useful tool for wirelessly controlling off-camera Speedlights. You’ll need to mount a flash to control off-camera units that take commands via an optical signal, or invest in a radio control system for your flashes. If you currently use a pop-up flash as a wireless commander, it’s an extra expense to consider when mulling an upgrade.

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